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Serving Henderson and Transylvania Counties in Western North Carolina

Enrollment Process for Disability Services

image of reserved parking signYour first step is to identify yourself to the Disability Services Office as a student with a disability and request specific accommodations. "Accommodations" include a range of services, equipment, and modifications designed to allow you to do your best. They vary according to the disability, and include such things as recording lectures, having extended exam time, and making classrooms wheelchair accessible.

Your next step is to obtain documentation of your disability and provide this to the Disability Services Office, please allow 3 to 5 business days for review. Documentation from your physician, psychologist, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, or other case manager may be sufficient. If you have a learning disability, head injury, or other impairment which affects your attention, concentration, and/or memory; current and comprehensive documentation by a qualified professional is needed to design your Individualized Accommodation Plan. The plan is based on your documentation and your discussion with the Disability Services Office counselor. Different disabilities require different documentation.

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD) 

Mobility

Psychological/Psychiatric

Medical

Learning Disabilities

Deaf And Hard-Of-Hearing

Visual Impairment

If you suspect that you have a learning disability, attention deficit disorder, or some other condition that impacts your learning, the Disability Services Office may be able to assist in referring you to a qualified professional for testing and diagnosis. Ideally, this should be done well before you enroll in classes. However, consult with the Disability Services Office counselor about the possibility of receiving accommodations while awaiting your test results.

Once you have this documentation, make an appointment with the Disability Services Office counselor to discuss your particular needs. You and your counselor will complete the following:

  • Student Data and Disclosure Form — Basic information about yourself
  • Consent to Release Confidential Information form — Permission to discuss your progress with your instructors
  • IAP — Individual plan for accommodations used while you are a student

These first steps should be taken at least three weeks prior to registration.

Accommodations for placement testing are available. Therefore, it is extremely important to make contact with the Disability Services Office as soon as you have decided to become a Blue Ridge Community College student. Placement testing with accommodations is available by appointment following the submission, review and approval of documentation by the Disability Services Office, to substantiate your accommodation request before testing.

Remember that before you register with Disability Services, you must apply to the College and complete the following:

  •    Submit  Application
  •    Provide Transcripts
  •    Schedule and take the Placement Test
  •    Apply for Financial Aid, if needed

Disability Services Student Handbook

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 Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD)

Documentation Requirements

  1. The following professionals are considered qualified to evaluate ADD/ADHD: an appropriately licensed /certified psychologist, psychiatrist, neuropsychiatrist, neurologist, or relevantly trained medical doctor. The professional must have expertise in evaluating the impact on the student's educational performance. All reports should be on letterhead, dated, and signed and include the name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator.

  2. Documentation should substantiate the need for service based on the student's current functioning in an educational setting.
     
  3. A comprehensive report should include:
    • A SPECIFIC diagnostic statement using DSM-IV classification, avoiding the use of terms such as "suggests," "is indicative of," or "attentional problems."

    • Discussion of the student's developmental, academic, mental, and social history.

    • Methods of assessment with supporting data such as checklists and rating scales. Psychoeducational batteries that include intelligence and achievement testing will allow the possibility of providing more services. Without a psychoeducational assessment, accommodations will be minimal.

    • Substantial limitations in an educational setting.

  4. If specific recommendations of accommodations are made, the rationale must relate each  accommodation to the functional limitations imposed by the disability. The final determination of appropriate and reasonable accommodations rests with Disability Services Office.

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 Mobility

Documentation Requirements

  1. The student's attending physician should originate current documentation for a mobility impairment. A specific diagnosis with treatment history and treatment plan should be included. 

  2. The report should include how the disability impacts the student in the educational setting. 

  3. If specific recommendations of accommodations are made, the rationale must relate the accommodation to the functional limitations imposed by the disability. The final determination of appropriate and reasonable accommodations rests with Disability Services Office.

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Psychological/Psychiatric

Documentation Requirements

  1. Documentation should be prepared by a licensed clinical psychologist or psychiatrist. The evaluation should include a current DSM-IV diagnosis and the treatment history and treatment plan. 

  2. The impact of the disorder on the individual should be discussed with particular detail regarding academic requirements. 

  3. If specific recommendations of accommodations are made, the rationale must relate the accommodation to the functional limitations imposed by the disability. The final determination of appropriate and reasonable accommodations rests with Disability Services Office.

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Medical

Documentation Requirements

  1. The student's attending physician should originate current documentation for a medical disability. A specific diagnosis with treatment history and treatment plan should be included. 

  2. The report should include how the disability impacts the student in the educational setting.

  3. If specific recommendations of accommodations are made, the rationale must relate the accommodation to the functional limitations imposed by the disability. The final determination of appropriate and reasonable accommodations rests with Disability Services Office. 

  4. In cases of head trauma or medical conditions that affect the brain, a neuropsychological evaluation may allow the student to be accommodated more thoroughly.

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Learning Disabilities

Documentation Requirements

  1. The following professionals are considered qualified to assess and diagnose learning disabilities: appropriately licensed/certified clinical psychologists, school psychologists, and neuropsychologists. The professional must have expertise in evaluating the impact on the student's educational performance. All reports should be on letterhead, dated, and signed and include the name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator.  

  2. Documentation should substantiate the need for service based on the student's current functioning in an educational setting.

  3. A psychoeducational evaluation should include a clinical interview. The student's developmental, academic, mental, and social history should be investigated and reported. This evaluation must include a comprehensive assessment battery including aptitude, achievement, and processing instruments.

The following aptitude tests are considered appropriate in the substantiation of a learning disability:

  • Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III)

  • Woodcock-Johnson Test Psychoeducational Battery-III: Test of Cognitive Ability

  • Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test (KAIT)

  • Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale

The Slosson Intelligence Test and the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test are primarily screening devices that are not comprehensive enough to provide the information necessary to make accommodation decisions.

The following achievement tests are considered appropriate in the substantiation of a learning disability:

  • Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-III: Tests of Achievement

  • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT)

  • Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults (SATA)

  • Stanford Test of Academic Skills

The Wide Range Achievement Test is not a comprehensive measure of achievement and, therefore, is not useful as the sole measure of achievement.

4. Individual "learning styles," "learning differences," "academic problems," "test difficulty or anxiety," and "weaknesses," in and of themselves, do not constitute a learning disability. The diagnostician is encouraged to use direct language in the diagnosis and documentation of a learning disability, avoiding the use of terms such as, "suggests" or "is indicative of."

5. If specific recommendations of accommodations are made, the rationale must relate the accommodation to the functional limitations imposed by the disability. The final determination of appropriate and reasonable accommodations rests with Disability Services Office.

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Deaf And Hard-Of-Hearing

Documentation Requirements

  1. An audiogram indicating the severity of the hearing impairment must be provided by a licensed audiologist.

  2. If specific recommendations of accommodations are made, the rationale must relate each accommodation to the functional limitations imposed by the disability. The final determination of appropriate and reasonable accommodations rests with Disability Services Office.

Local and national shortages of sign language interpreters make providing their services a critical concern for Disability Services Office. Thus a two week minimum notice of need for interpreting services is requested.

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Visual Impairment

Documentation Requirements

  1. An eye report or a specific diagnosis indicating the severity of the visual impairment must be provided by an ophthalmologist.

  2. If specific recommendations of accommodations are made, the rationale must relate each accommodation to the functional limitations imposed by the disability. The final determination of appropriate and reasonable accommodations rests with Disability Services Office. 

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