Local Air Force veteran Cody Moore chooses Blue Ridge Community College to start anew

 

BRCC News | Published September 30, 2019

Portrait of Cody Moore

Cody Moore, a U.S. Air Force veteran and local, is returning to school after changing his major, and has chosen Blue Ridge Community College as the institution to start anew and earn his associate’s degree.

The 29-year-old moved to Hendersonville in 2000 from Sumter, South Carolina, and originally attended school at Western Carolina University where he earned his bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from 2008-2012 and later joined the Air Force in 2014. 

“I looked at everything, and wasn’t satisfied with where I was in life, so I looked into the military. The Air Force just fit with my personal style the best,” he said.

After going to San Antonio, Moore was shipped overseas to Okinawa, Japan, where he remained for two years.

After exiting the Air Force, Moore was faced with a conundrum: despite his degree in criminal justice, he felt he wasn’t stern enough to serve as a police officer.

Although he decided police work wasn’t for him, he still sought a role that allows him to serve his community, so he said he decided to start from scratch, and immediately thought of Blue Ridge Community College.

Despite having been a veteran, of both military and academic tours, Moore is considered a freshman once again, and is double-majoring in Paramedic and Emergency Disaster Management.

When he attended East Henderson High School as a young man, Moore took several dual enrollment classes through Blue Ridge, and said he developed a positive opinion of the college right away.

He said one major advantage Blue Ridge has over other colleges is that he’s never heard any negative feedback about it.

“Some people think that a community college is small-minded or isn’t as connected as a four-year college, but what I’m seeing is people graduating fully trained and owing far less for their choice of college,” he said.

Since he’s returning to college as an adult, Moore now sees classes as a manner of personal enrichment, rather than a mandatory, unquestioned step in life, which is how he saw school at 18 years old.

“I just went because that seemed like the next logical step in my life. Then, you’re just sorta set loose, and I think that sort of freedom can really get to an 18-year-old’s head, and I didn’t take it as seriously as I should have,” he added.

Through his work with the military, Moore believes he’ll be better prepared to encounter new challenges and changes in his life.

When not in school, Moore enjoys spending time with his friends and significant other, playing with his dogs and watching the Carolina Panthers.

He hopes to work on “keeping himself more present” than he’s been in the past, and to focus on completing his schooling. He then hopes to find work with an agency and grow in his career.

“I definitely want to thank the people in the Registrar’s office and Financial Aid, especially Crystal Smith, who helped make this a very smooth transition,” he said. “The people there made it easy, so I wasn’t stressed about it. I’m happy to be starting over at Blue Ridge Community College.”